Paths and gardens around the Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh and the Bahjí Pilgrim House
Paths and gardens around the Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh and the Bahjí Pilgrim House

Holy Day Celebrations

The Baha'i Calendar

The Baha’i year consists of 19 months of 19 days each (361 days), with the addition of “Intercalary Days” (four in ordinary and five in leap years) between the eighteenth and nineteenth months to adjust the calendar to the solar year. The months are named after the attributes of God. The Baha’i New Year is astronomically fixed and begins with the March equinox (March 21). The Baha’i Era commenced with the year of the Bab’s declaration (1844 A.D.).

Each Baha’i community holds a Nineteen Day Feast on the first day of each Baha’i month. The Feast has spiritual, administrative and social functions and is the primary locus of fellowship and community decision-making in each Baha'i locality. Because the Baha’i day lasts from sunset to sunset, the Nineteen Day Feast is generally held in the evening on the day before the first day of the Baha’i month according to the Gregorian calendar.


Ayyam-i-ha or Intercalary Days (Feb. 26-March 1)

Ayyam-i-ha, or “Days of Ha,” are devoted to spiritual preparation for the Fast, celebrating, hospitality, charity and gift giving. They are celebrated the four days (five in leap year) before the last month of the Baha’i year.

Naw-Rúz (March 21)

The Baha’i New Year’s Day is astronomically fixed to begin the year on the spring equinox. Naw-Rúz is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Festival of Ridvan (April 21-May 2)

The annual Baha’i festival commemorates the 12 days (April 21-May 2, 1863) when Baha’u’llah, the prophet-founder of the Baha’i Faith, resided in a garden called Ridvan (Paradise) in Baghdad, Iraq. At this time He publicly proclaimed His mission as God’s Messenger for this age. The first (April 21), ninth (April 29) and twelfth (May 2) days are celebrated as holy days when work is suspended.

Declaration of the Bab (May 23)

The Baha’i commemorates May 23, 1844, when the Bab, the prophet-herald of the Baha’i Faith, announced in Shiraz, Persia, that he was the herald of a new messenger of God. It is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Ascension of Baha’u’llah (May 29)

Baha’is observe the anniversary of the death in exile of Baha’u’llah, the prophet-founder of the Baha’i Faith, on May 29, 1892. It is one of the nine holy days of the year where work is suspended.

Martyrdom of the Bab (July 9)

The holy day commemorates the anniversary of the execution of the Bab (Siyyid ‘Ali-Muhammad), the prophet-herald of the Baha’i Faith, by a firing squad on July 9, 1850, in Tabriz, Persia. It is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Birth of the Bab (Oct. 20)

The day is an observance of the anniversary of the birth on Oct. 20, 1819, in Shiraz, Persia, of Siyyid ‘Ali-Muhammad, who later took the title of “the Bab,” meaning “the Gate.” The Bab was the prophet-herald of the Baha’i Faith. The day is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Birth of Baha’u’llah (Nov. 12)

Baha’is observe the anniversary of the birth of Baha’u’llah (born Mirza Husayn-‘Ali) on Nov. 12, 1817, in Núr, Persia. Baha’u’llah, which means the “Glory of God,” is the prophet-founder of the Baha’i Faith. It is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Day of the Covenant (Nov. 26)

The festival commemorates Baha’u’llah's appointment of his eldest son, ‘Abdu’l-Baha, as the Center of His Covenant.

Ascension of 'Abdu'l-Baha (Nov 28)

Baha’is observe the anniversary of the death of ‘Abdu’l-Baha, son of Baha’u’llah and His appointed succesor, on Nov 28, 1921.

Bicentenary Celebrations

Study Circles

Children's Classes

Devotional Meetings

Holy Day Celebrations